Parents Sue Monster Energy Drink After Girl’s Death

Posted on Oct 23 2012 - 5:40am by Tracy

The parents of a 14-year-old Hagerstown girl who died after consuming 48 ounces of Monster Energy drinks within a 24-hour span have filed suit against the maker of the high-caffeine beverages, saying the company’s product killed their daughter last December.

Monster is based in Corona, Calif.

An autopsy found that Fournier died of cardiac arrhythmia due to caffeine toxicity that impeded her heart’s ability to pump blood. She suffered from an inherited disorder that can weaken blood vessels.

Monster says it doesn’t believe its beverages are responsible for Fournier’s death. The company says it’s not aware of any fatalities caused by its drinks. Monster says it will vigorously fight the lawsuit.

An autopsy found that Fournier died of cardiac arrhythmia due to caffeine toxicity that impeded her heart’s ability to pump blood. She suffered from an inherited disorder that can weaken blood vessels.

Fournier’s mother told NBC4 that her daughter was screened regularly and was never given any caffeine restrictions.

She said she wants to see the FDA regulate energy drinks. Currently, it does not limit the amount of caffeine in energy drinks, or who can purchase them.

A Mayo Clinic study found that two 24-ounce cans of Monster Energy Drink contain 480 milligrams of caffeine, the equivalent of five eight-ounce cups of coffee.

“Having coffee and staying awake is one thing, but drinking multiple cans of highly caffeinated beverages without knowing how much caffeine you’re actually consuming is a dangerous activity,” said Amelia Arria, a medical researcher at the University of Maryland.

Arria believes the FDA needs to take a tougher stance on energy drinks, especially when it comes to kids “because they’re smaller; they can’t handle a large amount of a psychoactive substance,” she said.

The American Beverage Association says it’s adopted voluntary guidelines for manufacturers, which includes clearer labeling and more restrictive policies regarding marketing to children.

Monster says it will vigorously fight the lawsuit.

NBC


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